Guidelines

cardsGoogle’s Material Design has helped designers by providing design principles based on a unified theory of a rationalized space using a material metaphor. A foundational element of the material design is the content card.

The skeuomorph is dead, long live the skeuomorph!

There are a ton of templates and resources for app designers to get their ideas onto cards and into their apps but many designers simply browse these resources for inspiration then apply their own interpretation. Therein lies the rub. Looking to other designers for inspiration risks misinterpretation of the design thinking (or principles) behind the design system. Continue reading Playing With Cards

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A few years back, I read Indi Young’s Mental Models – Aligning Design Strategy with Human Behavior. I was inspired by the detailed and methodical process she outlined to better understand a customer “problem space”.

Unfortunately, it’s not always practical for scrum teams to allocate several sprints to research and map a mental model of the customer. And Indi will tell you “Research Doesn’t Fit into Fast-Spinning Cycles”. 

So how do you get some of the directional goodness of mental model into your sprint? Continue reading Include Customer Statements in Your User Stories

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If it’s true that 77% of app downloads are never used within 72 hours after installing, you have to wonder about lost dollars in development.

Consider that the average cost for developing and deploying an app is $5o-$300k. Multiply that times the current rate of new apps appearing in the app store alone; roughly 252 per day.

We’re talking $12m – $75m spent every day with $9 – $58m of that investment yielding $0 in ROI. With that probability of loss, why would anyone deploy an app without testing the concept with a target audience? Continue reading App Testing In The Wild

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In an agile organization, the User Story replaces traditional requirement documentation. While traditional requirements like functional or user interface specifications try to be as detailed as possible, User Stories break down the business requirements into the smallest piece of business value that a development team can deliver within an iteration.

That said, there is an art to writing effective user stories and UX designers cannot simply rename their User Interface Specifications to User Stories. Use the following guidelines to consistently deliver requirements that can be easily understood by your development teams. Continue reading A guide to Writing Effective User Stories

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Do you ever find yourself drifting off while conducting interviews? Are you having trouble remembering what an interviewee said during a conversation? Are you busy thinking of your response or opinion before the other person has finished speaking?

If this describes you, your hearing may be fine but your listening needs work. To get more out of  interviews and conversations, you’ll need to work on becoming an “active listener”.

Guidelines

To be an active listener, you’ll need to clear your mind, focus, ask questions, reflect, and paraphrase throughout the conversation. Here are 12 helpful tips to follow the next time you have important feedback to collect. Continue reading Listen up!…and have better interviews

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With the increasing importance of the product experience as a competitive differentiation, designers need to think about making value connections with their customers. Designing for value requires discipline. Using successful measures of value opportunity will help designers get there.

Originally introduced in 2001 by Craig M. Vogel, Jonathan Cagan, and recently cited in the International Encyclopedia of Ergonomics and Human Factors, Value Opportunities provide the best opportunity to connect with customers in a deeper more meaningful way.

When designing a product experience, consider the following Value Opportunities as a means of measurement to determine if your product experience is hitting the mark. Continue reading Design For Value and Connect With Customers

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If you look up the definition of persona you will learn there are various types of persona, each different depending on their context of use. There are persona for literature, music, video games, communication studies, psychology, marketing and user experience design. Although their use varies, personas typically include people, actions,  behaviors, a back story, and specific context or scenario.

If you plan to develop and  use persona in your experience design work, make sure you follow a structured approach. Continue reading About Personas

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Finding the right terminology for a product’s features and content can be challenging. This can be especially challenging if the original taxonomy evolved within a highly specialized group or culture. Terminology born under these circumstances can easily be considered jargon and completely foreign to others outside the group.So how do we avoid terms that can be considered jargon? Continue reading Name That Thing Exercise

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